Transforming Wellbeing Theory & Practice
Transforming Wellbeing Theory & Practice
Blending technological innovations with demystified human nature to empower positive transformations at scale.
— Prof. Agnis Stibe
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Transforming Wellbeing Theory (TWT) is emerging as an inevitable response to the ever-growing imbalance in our lives across the globe. Over the decades, we have been advancing technologies to make our lives better. The fundamental question still remains: with all the evolving innovations, are we gaining decent success in achieving happier and more sustainable societies? Every crucial domain of our lives continuously provides evidence of how things are getting imbalanced despite us making huge progress in building increasingly capable technological innovations, such as artificial intelligence, blockchain, augmented reality, autonomous vehicles, and drones, just to name a few. The TWT advances scientific knowledge and its practical applications to transform lives. Due to its strong fundament that intertwines technological innovations with human nature, the theory is applicable in many essential life contexts, including health, education, sustainability, equality, governance, safety, emergency, management, marketing, ecology, economy, and dwelling. This work also includes a transforming toolset with 8 applicable instruments that are sharpened for immediate use.

Prof. Agnis Stibe is a global thought leader on science-driven transformation and a founder of the Transforming Wellbeing Theory & Practice. He is a Wellbeing Ambassador, some say. At the renowned Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT Media Lab), he established research on Persuasive Cities that encourage healthy and sustainable living. He believes that our world can become a better place through purposefully designed innovative spaces and experiences that successfully blend technological advancements with human nature. At ESLSCA Business School Paris, he continues leveraging socio-psychological theories in creation of sustainable transformations towards wellbeing and accelerated businesses. He has worked for Fortune 100 companies, including Hewlett-Packard and Oracle. He has received multiple prestigious awards, also from the MIT Media Lab (USA) and Nokia Foundation (Finland). He proudly serves on several advisory boards, one being for the Australian leader in healthy breakfast production Sanitarium. His work is an outstanding example and firm evidence on how science can help transforming life. His TEDx talks continue gaining global popularity.




EXAMPLES

Persuasive Cities. (USA, 2016. Photo: Matthias Wunsch)

What is in the Box? (The Netherlands, 2016)

What is in the Box? (The Netherlands, 2016)

Space on Streets. (Riga, 2014)

Space on Streets. (Riga, 2014)


Science & Practice

Stibe, A., Röderer, K., Reisinger, M., & Nyström, T. (2019). Empowering Sustainable Change: Emergence of Transforming Wellbeing Theory (TWT). Persuasive Technology [PDF]

Stibe, A. (2018). Envisioning the Theory of Transforming Wellbeing: Influencing Technology and Sociotech Design. Keynote. Budva, Montenegro [PDF]

Stibe, A. (2018). New Profession - Wellbeing Ambassador. IV World Congress of Latvian Scientists. Innovation: Science + Business [PDF]

Stibe, A. (2017). The Purpose of Innovations. Accenture Latvia Magazine [PDF]

Stibe, A., & Larson, K. (2016). Persuasive Cities for Sustainable Wellbeing: Quantified Communities. Mobile Web and Intelligent Information Systems [PDF]

Stibe, A., & Cugelman, B. (2016). Persuasive Backfiring: When Behavior Change Interventions Trigger Unintended Negative OutcomesPersuasive Technology [PDF]

Stibe, A. (2015). Advancing Typology of Computer-Supported Influence: Moderation Effects in Socially Influencing SystemsPersuasive Technology [PDF]

Stibe, A. (2015). Towards a Framework for Socially Influencing Systems: Meta-Analysis of Four PLS-SEM Based StudiesPersuasive Technology [PDF]


We are social beings by nature, and have been for ages.
Today, technologies enable new ways to shrink the world by bringing us closer together. While such innovations often serve as media channels, they can also be purposefully designed to transform our lives.
— Prof. Agnis Stibe